N2A Motors at SEMA

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N2A Motors is ready for the world stage at the premier automotive specialty products trade event … the SEMA Show. The 2016 SEMA (Specialty Equipment Market Association) Show will take place November 1-4 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. SEMA attracts more than 60,000 industry leaders from more than 100 countries and 2400 manufacturers will be there to display and sell their products.

Once again, N2A Motors is proud to represent at this show with two of our custom Chevys. Both cars inspired by the front of the ’57 Chevy, the midsection of the ’58 Chevy, and the rear of the ’59 Chevy. For the SEMA Show, N2A Motors will be showcasing the 789SS – using their 2-seat design with a Corvette chassis – and the Cruiser – a 4-seater created from a Camaro chassis honoring 50 years of since its unveiling.

And by the way, anyone who attends the show and talks to N2A Motors reps may be in for a treat … a special discount on one of these classic beauties of your own. How awesome would it be to roll down Route 66, Pacific Coast Highway or Hollywood Blvd driving one of these head-turning beauties!! Truly classic in look and styling and innovative in power and design! This is definitely not the same old car you used to drive or the same new car that looks like everyone else.

This is a trade-only event and not open to the general public. SEMA is a trade association consisting of a diverse group of group of manufacturers, distributors, retailers, publishing companies, auto restorers, street rod builders, re-stylers, car clubs, race teams and more. Click here to find out more about attending: https://www.semashow.com

Global Unveiling of Trion Nemesis: An American Supercar

On Sunday, July 26th, Trion SuperCars, a US-based automotive technology company, unveiled their unique and innovative supercar–the Nemesis. In development since 2012, Trion SuperCars intends to shake up the existing supercar industry, challenging established European brands.

The first prototypes will be built by N2A Motors of California and should be out and about at the start of 2016. The company specializes in “custom auto manufacturer with a mission of reviving the art of American coach building.”

Gene Langmesser, owner and founder of N2A Motors has a long, successful history in the Aerospace & Automotive industry. He has developed a unique skill set affording him the ability to understand and implement any project from paper to pavement. Part visionary, part grease monkey, Gene has spawned world renowned engineering teams, executed cutting edge vehicle programs for both domestic and international OEMs, and has introduced new innovations that have transformed the automotive industry.

N2A Motors Wins Build Contract for the “BEAST” by Rezvani

Recently unleashed in California by Rezvani, this is the “Beast.” The brainchild of an award winning car designer, the Beast is a 500-hp lightweight Supercar with an open top design. And, N2A Motors is proud to have won the build contract for the Beast by Rezvani. Clocking 62 mph in just 2.7 seconds, it can hit a top speed of 165 mph, all with the roof permanently off. Is this a new breed of Supercar? Or just a rehash of stuff that is already out there? Whatever you think, you can’t argue that this is one impressive machine.

 

 

Dodge Charger, F-250 popular with car theives

img-1The most theft-prone vehicle in America might be the Dodge Charger. Or it might be the Ford F-250 pickup truck.

Those are the contradictory conclusions of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the insurance industry-funded Highway Loss Data Institute.

Still, the government agency and private group agree that the theft of late-model vehicles is on a rapid decline in the United States. One reason: automakers’ increasing use of ignition immobilizers, which stop thieves from hot-wiring cars. Nearly 90 percent of 2012 models are equipped with them.

In a report released on Monday, NHTSA said the car stolen most often during the 2011 calendar year was the Charger, with 4.8 thefts for every 1,000 cars produced in 2011. It was followed by the Mitsubishi Galant, Hyundai Accent, Chevrolet Impala and Chevrolet HHR among vehicles with more than 5,000 units produced that year.

Pickup trucks took the top five places in dueling rankings released today by HLDI, an affiliate of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In first place was the Ford F-250 crew-cab with four-wheel drive, followed by the Chevrolet Silverado 1500, Chevrolet Avalanche 1500, GMC Sierra 1500 crew, and Ford F-350 crew with four-wheel drive. The rankings cover model years 2010 to 2012.

The Cadillac Escalade, long the most theft-prone vehicle according to HLDI, dropped to sixth place after GM reworked the SUV to thwart thieves.

“General Motors has put a lot of effort into new antitheft technology, so that may help explain the decline,” Matt Moore, vice president of the group, said in a statement.

Different methodology

The two reports produced separate results because of differences in methodology, Moore said during an interview. His group bases its rankings on a database of insurance claims, while NHTSA counts thefts reported to police.

Moore said large pickup trucks are also particularly prone to theft claims because owners can recoup the cost of equipment stolen from the flatbed.

Still, the two groups can agree on some of their findings — including that the Charger is stolen more frequently than most vehicles. While the muscle car did not make the top 10 most stolen models according to HLDI, the group found that it had 3.5 theft claims per 1,000 years of insurance coverage, or triple the average model.

Experts are not exactly sure what makes the Charger so popular with thieves, although the car’s ample horsepower might be part of the equation.

“If I were a thief I might be able to answer that better,” Moore said during a phone interview. “They’re powerful vehicles,” he added.

NHTSA says its preliminary data show that model-year 2011 vehicles were stolen that calendar year at rates 91 percent lower than the year before.

Steep decline?

In 2011, there were only 0.1 thefts for every thousand vehicles produced, down from 1.17 thefts per thousand cars in 2010. To compile the report, which contains statistics from 226 vehicle lines, NHTSA compared vehicle theft data from the FBI’s National Crime Information Center with production data reported to the EPA.

NHTSA says its latest findings mark a record decline in the theft rate. NHTSA data show that the nation’s vehicle theft rate has declined by an average of 13 percent each year since 2006, which was the last time the rate increased.

Terri Miller, executive director of Help Eliminate Auto Thefts, or H.E.A.T., a public-private partnership dedicated to the prevention of vehicle theft, was skeptical of NHTSA’s conclusion.

She said auto theft is dropping, but she would be surprised if it is happening as quickly as the report indicates.

“It seems like a very dramatic decrease,” Miller said.